Zero to sixty (0 to 60) in Google Drive for education teaching and learning
Google logo, marks and screen captures used with the permission granted here.

by Alex Bruton

Referring to this?

Thinking about using Google Drive?

This topic is designed to help you get from zero to sixty as quickly as possible with Google Drive. It’s not intended to replace the tutorials provided by your organization, by your school or by Google – I doubt there’s anything here you won’t already find in their materials. The goal is just to share some things I found out when working with it; especially some of the things I think students and teachers might benefit from learning right off the bat their first time through.

You can jump right into the videos below. Or read some of the basics on the right.

Getting a google account

Because you need to have a Google Account before you can use Google Drive, this video takes you through using the google account signup page. (NOTE: If you’re using Google Drive in a business, school or university then you might want to make sure you need to sign up for a new account at all – a Google Account may already have been created for you.)


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Getting started with Google Drive

This video takes you through the basics of using Google Drive. We’ll cover enough to get you set up with it: accessing it online; exploring some of the basics; looking at how it’s different from Google Docs; and installing the Google Drive software on your computer.


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Creating, Collaborating and Submitting with Google Drive

Now you know the basics of accessing Google Drive, let’s get started! This video shows how to create a document, how to share it with a colleague, and how to collaborate together. It also shows two ways in which you can submit it to your teacher or professor. The first is by sharing it with them and the second is by putting it in a folder they’ve created for collecting your work.


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Using Google Drive to submit work others can view

Depending on the type of assignment you’re doing, your teacher might require you to submit a link to some work you’ve been doing. This might be the link to a Google Doc or a Google Presentation that everyone else in the class can see too. (See the Chit Chat YOU presentations as an example of this.) The following video outlines how this works:


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Educator access

The teaching notes for this topic contain the following video on how to set up Google Drive so you can collect and manage submissions from your students:


To access for free...

They also contain the following video on how to set things up specifically so you can receive student submissions in a way that they can see each others’ work:


To access for free...

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1 Comment

  1. Barbara Johnson-Clark

    Material wasn’t clear enough to read.

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